Combustible Celluloid
 
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With: Jason Patric, Bruce Willis, John Cusack, Jessica Lowndes, Tara Holt, Gia Mantegna, 50 Cent, Rain, Johnathon Schaech, Courtney B Turk, Natalie Light, Don Harvey, Jaylen Moore, Tyler J. Olson, Tim Fields
Written by: Andre Fabrizio, Jeremy Passmore
Directed by: Brian A Miller
MPAA Rating: R for violence, drug content and language
Running Time: 93
Date: 08/22/2014
IMDB

The Prince (2014)

1 Star (out of 4)

Royal Dud

By Jeffrey M. Anderson

A veteran of low-budget, low-profile action movies, director Brian A. Miller turns in a fairly typical, lackluster, knuckle-dragging thriller with The Prince.

Mississippi mechanic Paul (Jason Patric) receives an odd call from his teen daughter, Beth (Gia Mantegna), who is away at college. He tries to reach her again, but she's gone. So he attempts tofind her. Enlisting the aid of one of her hard-partying friends, Amanda (Jessica Lowndes), he traces her to a drug dealer in New Orleans. Unfortunately, Paul's presence in town sparks an old rivalry with gangster Omar (Bruce Willis), who wishes to take his revenge on Paul. Paul, too, is more than meets the eye, and his past colleagues, like Sam (John Cusack), as well as past enemies, quickly begin to take notice of him. Will Paul's past overtake his presence and endanger the life of his daughter?

As the story begins, it doesn't make sense that the hero would put so much faith and trust in a college girl, and when it's revealed that he's a kind of super-soldier, it makes even less sense. He comes across as unflappable and practically invincible, with everything under control. No one seems to be in danger, and nothing ever seems truly at stake.

This character negatively impacts the rest of the cast. Rain (from Ninja Assassin), playing a deadly right-hand man, Bruce Willis as a gangster, or Curtis "50 Cent' Jackson playing a dangerous drug dealer, never seem like real threats. Nor does John Cusack, as a trustworthy old pal, seem very helpful. The movie glides along lifelessly at a surface level, hitting plot points, but not investing in the characters, the emotional heft, or any suspense. THE PRINCE is a royal dud.

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