Combustible Celluloid
 
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With: Brandon Routh, Sam Huntington, Peter Stormare, Taye Diggs, Anita Briem, Kurt Angle, Brian Steele, Kimberly Whalen, Randal Reeder, Ashlynn Ross, Courtney J. Clark, Courtney Shay Young, Ada Michelle Loridans, Kent Jude Bernard, Marco St. John
Written by: Thomas Dean Donnelly, Joshua Oppenheimer, based on a comic book by Tiziano Sclavi
Directed by: Kevin Munroe
MPAA Rating: PG-13 for sequences of creature violence and action, language including some sexual references, and some drug material
Running Time: 107
Date: 01/01/2010
IMDB

Dylan Dog: Dead of Night (2011)

2 1/2 Stars (out of 4)

Private Awry

By Jeffrey M. Anderson

Directed by Kevin Munroe, Dylan Dog: Dead of Night kicks off with a great idea to combine the old-style detective genre with some popular monsters, but after such an inspired start, the movie feels oddly uninspired. The mystery isn't very hard to figure out, the comedy isn't very funny, and the monsters are not very scary; even the visual effects show little imagination. Munroe never conjures up anything remotely scary, and his action scenes are lumpy and sluggish.

Dylan Dog (Brandon Routh) is a detective currently working on infidelity cases in New Orleans, alongside his wisecracking assistant Marcus (Sam Huntington). But his true calling is to keep tab on the city's secret community of monsters (vampires, werewolves, zombies, etc.). A gruesome murder, committed by a werewolf, and a stolen artifact reluctantly brings him out of retirement, not to mention the victim's pretty daughter, Elizabeth (Anita Briem). Dylan must re-enter the underworld, re-connect with his old contacts (Peter Stormare, Taye Diggs, etc.), navigate a complex mystery, and hopefully find a solution before an even bigger, deadlier monster is unleashed.

Routh is slowly beginning to demonstrate some of the personality he was lacking in Superman Returns, and his character is mostly interesting, despite some bumps in logic; he begins the movie as a slob, but quickly changes over to a sleek, black wardrobe once he takes on the new mystery. Perhaps a better movie could have done some justice to this potentially appealing character, but this is not it.

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